Assessment of the value of repeated point-prevalence surveys for analyzing the trend in nosocomial infections

Publié le 1 Janvier 2005
Mis à jour le 10 septembre 2019

OBJECTIVE. To assess the value of repeated point-prevalence surveys in measuring the trend in nosocomial infections after adjustment for case mix. SETTING. A 3,500-bed teaching facility composed of 4 acute care hospitals. METHODS. From May 1992 to June 1996, eight point-prevalence surveys of nosocomial infections were performed in the hospitals using a sampling process. The trend of adjusted nosocomial infection rates was studied for the four surveys that collected data on indwelling catheters. Adjusted rates were calculated using a logistic regression model and a direct standardization method. RESULTS. From 1992 to 1996, a total of 20,238 patients were included in the 8 point-prevalence surveys. The nosocomial infection rate decreased from 8.6% in 1992 to 5% in 1996 (P < .001). The analysis of adjusted nosocomial infection rates included 9,600 patients. Four independent risk factors were identified: length of stay greater than 12 days, hospitalization in an intensive care unit, presence of an indwelling urinary catheter, and history of a surgical procedure. After adjustment for case mix, the nosocomial infection rate still showed a downward trend (from 7.2% in 1993 to 5.1% in 1996; P = .02). CONCLUSION. Adjusted prevalence rates of nosocomial infections showed a significant downward trend during the period of this study. (R.A.)

Auteur : Sartor C, Delchambre A, Pascal L, Drancourt M, de Micco P, Sambuc R
Infection control and hospital epidemiology, 2005, vol. 26, n°. 4, p. 369-73